Glossary

glossary

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A B C D E F G H I K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z
  • DEFINITION

    Language spoken by a large part of the population of a country, which may or may not be designated an official language (i.e. a language designated by law to be employed in the public domain).

    UNESCO. Education for all: literacy for life; EFA global monitoring report, 2006. Paris: UNESCO, 2006.

    EXAMPLE OF USE

    In some situations where refugees expect a long wait before it is safe to return home, it may be possible to use a curriculum that ‘faces both ways’. Thus Afghan refugees in Pakistan in the 1980s and 1990s used a version of their home country curriculum but with the added subject of Urdu, the national language of Pakistan (Sinclair, 2002: 72).

    Sinclair, Margaret. Planning education in and after emergencies. Fundamentals of Educational Planning 73. Paris: UNESCO-IIEP, 2002. 

  • DEFINITION

    Number of pupils in the official age group for a given level of education who attend school at that level, expressed as a percentage of the population in that age group.

    EXAMPLE OF USE

    Family and other commitments can be expected to cause some irregularity of attendance among most learners. However, with reliable and competent facilitators, aided by special local arrangements to encourage regular attendance, attendance rates can be expected to average around 75 to 80 per cent. Without such arrangements, planners should expect much lower attendance rates (Oxenham, 2008: 48). , According to the 2010 Demographic and Health Survey, however, the primary net attendance rate was 80%, well below the 98% net enrolment ratio estimate provided by the UIS for 2008. One reason for this discrepancy is likely to be differences in the way information is collected on child age (UNESCO, 2014: 54).

  • DEFINITION

    Enrolment of the official age group for a given level of education, expressed as a percentage of the population in that age group.

    EXAMPLE OF USE

    Had the rate of decline between 1999 and 2008 been maintained, the number of children out of school would be 23 million by 2015, just below the EFA target of a 97% net enrolment ratio (UNESCO, 2014: 53).

  • DEFINITION

    Pupils entering a given level of education for the first time; the difference between enrolment and repeaters in the first grade of the level.

    EXAMPLE OF USE

    Table 5 presents another view of the impact of ECD: the percentage of new entrants to grade 1 of the primary school who had attended some form of ECD programme (Atchoarena and Gasperini, 2003: 94).

  • DEFINITION

    Education that is institutionalised, intentional and planned by an education provider. The defining characteristic of non-formal education is that it is an addition, alternative and/ or complement to formal education within the process of the lifelong learning of individuals. It is often provided to guarantee the right of access to education for all. It caters to people of all ages but does not necessarily apply a continuous pathway-structure; it may be short in duration and/or low-intensity, and it is typically provided in the form of short courses, workshops or seminars. Non-formal education mostly leads to qualifications that are not recognised as formal or equivalent to formal qualifications by the relevant national or sub-national education authorities or to no qualifications at all. Non-formal education can cover programmes contributing to adult  p 81and youth literacy and education for out-ofschool children, as well as programmes on life skills, work skills, and social or cultural development.

    UIS. International Standard Classification of Education, ISCED 2011. Montreal: UIS, 2012.

    EXAMPLE OF USE

    Finally, it should again be emphasized that non-formal education is an essential factor in rural development. The diffi culties involved in managing, evaluating and sustainably developing non-formal education are well-known, and we must strive to construct indicators that will be of assistance to these processes. This is not the least of the challenges presented by this type of work, and is one that this guide will endeavour to take up (Sauvageot and Dias da Graça, 2007:19).

    Sauvageot, Claude, et Patricia Dias da Graça. Using indicators in planning education for rural people in Africa: a practical guide. Paris; Rome: UNESCO-IIPE; FAO, 2007.

  • DEFINITION

    Usually, the ability to add, subtract, multiply and divide. More broadly, it means the knowledge and skills required to effectively manage and respond to mathematical demands posed by diverse situations, involving objects, pictures, numbers, symbols, formulas, diagrams, maps, graphs, tables and text. Encompassing the ability to order and sort, count, estimate, compute, measure, and follow a model, it involves responding to information about mathematical ideas that may be represented in a range of ways.

    UNESCO. Education for all: literacy for life; EFA global monitoring report, 2006. Paris: UNESCO, 2006.

    EXAMPLE OF USE

    There is plenty of opportunity to bring literacy and numeracy closer to people’s lives. Through integrated and multi-sectoral approaches – such as family literacy and learning, literacy embedded in vocational training or linked to income generation, and literacy as part of livelihood, agricultural extension or health programmes – literacy learning can become more meaningful, motivational and ‘natural’, in particular for disadvantaged population groups (UIL, 2017: 4).

    UIL. Literacy and numeracy from a lifelong learning perspective. UIL policy brief 7. Hamburg: UIL, 2017.