Glossary

glossary

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A B C D E F G H I K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z
  • DEFINITION

    The understanding that women and men have equal conditions for realizing their full human rights and for contributing to, and benefiting from, economic, social, cultural and political development.

    UNESCO. A Guide for ensuring inclusion and equity in education. Paris: UNESCO, 2017.

    EXAMPLE OF USE

    It is further helpful to define priority target groups, and/or targeted geographical areas – giving special attention to populations who are denied access to school or who have only very elementary literacy skills – including consideration of gender, age, languages, the unemployed, migrants, the disabled, etc. Regarding gender, it should be noted that targeting women is not the same as promoting gender balance or gender equality. To do this, the subject of gender equality needs to be included in the curriculum or in the very objectives of the programme (Lind, 2008: 131).

    Lind, Agneta. Literacy for all: making a difference. Fundamentals of Educational Planning 89. Paris: UNESCO-IIEP, 2008.

  • DEFINITION

    Ratio of female to male values of a given indicator. A GPI between 0.97 and 1.03 indicates parity between the genders. A GPI below 0.97 indicates a disparity in favour of males. A GPI above 1.03 indicates a disparity in favour of females.

    EXAMPLE OF USE

    Worldwide, the Gender Parity Index (GPI) for adult literacy improved significantly between 1970 and 2000-2004, especially in the Arab states (from 0.34 to 0.69), East Asia and the Pacific (from 0.62 to 0.92), sub-Saharan Africa (from 0.49 to 0.76) and South and West Asia (from 0.40 to 0.66). In Latin America and the Caribbean, gender parity in adult literacy rates has almost been achieved, standing at 0.98 (Lind, 2008: 27).

  • DEFINITION

    A Geographical Information System is a computer program which combines two databases. The first one holds numerical data and is as such very similar to the information base you will find in a programme such as Dbase or Access. In the case of an education system, these would be the ‘traditional’ education management data on schools, teachers and students. The second database files geographic data, such as the location of schools, the boundaries of districts, the location of villages and cities, of roads, rivers and mountains, and other relevant geographical characteristics. The GIS links these two sets so that statistical data can be presented not only as tables and graphs but also as maps, which helps the reader to look for spatial patterns (Attfield, Tamiru, Parolin and De Grauwe, 2001: 9)

    EXAMPLE OF USE

    Information collection has become needs-driven, and the capacity to process, analyse, share, and disseminate information has been improved, reducing overlap in activities. New data visualization techniques, including mapping and geographic information systems (GIS), have improved decision-making processes. Lastly, it has enabled managers to use information at the policy and implementation levels, and has led to better coordination and resource allocation (Arefee, 2011: 92).