Can school grants lead to school improvement? An overview of experiences of five countries: a synthesis of desk reviews of Ghana, Indonesia, Lesotho, Nicaragua, and Sri Lanka [draft]

Other title(s): Can school grants lead to school improvement? An overview of experiences of five countries: a synthesis of desk reviews of Ghana, Indonesia, Lesotho, Nicaragua, and Sri Lanka [draft]

Author(s): Lugaz, Candy; Deffous, Elodie; De Grauwe, Anton

Organisation(s): UNESCO-IIEP

Date: 2011

Pages: 28 p.

Download

Present in an increasing number of countries, school grant policies represent a major reform in educational management. Schools, which before such policies had very little or no say about financial management, now receive grants directly from central authorities. They are at present not only asked to deal with these grants but also to use them more or less as they see fit in order to improve the school's functioning and quality. In some countries, especially OECD member countries, this practice is not new; in quite a few countries, it dates back to the school-based management policies of the 1980s. In many developing countries, this reform is, however, much more recent as it is directly linked to the introduction of fee-free education over the past few years: as schools are no longer allowed to ask parents for fees, they are given grants to make up for the loss of income. This fits within the trend towards more school autonomy. This document is aimed at giving a broader understanding of the policy and concept of school grants in developing countries and, in order to do so, it refers to five countries in particular: Ghana, Indonesia, Lesotho, Nicaragua, and Sri Lanka.

Bookmark this

Ressources liées